Habergham-Eaves

HABERGHAM-EAVES, a township, in the parochial chapelry and poor-law union of Burnley, parish of Whalley, N. division of the hundred of Blackburn and of the county of Lancaster; including part of the town of Burnley, and containing 8526 inhabitants. As early as the year 1201, Habergham gave name to a local family, of whom the last male heir, born in 1650, married the daughter of Nicholas Townley, of Royle, and died without issue, when the estate came, by the foreclosure of a mortgage, to the family of Halsted. This important manufacturing township comprises 2396 acres of land, chiefly pasture; the scenery is mountainous, and the soil for the most part a stiff clay. The lower lands are watered by the river Calder, and the township is intersected by the Leeds and Liverpool canal, the roads to Blackburn and to Bury, and the East Lancashire railway. It has extensive and valuable coal-mines, numerous cotton-mills, and some large print-works: here, also, are barracks for cavalry and infantry, capable of accommodating 500 men, besides officers. Townley Hall, the seat of the ancient family of Townley, originally stood on a lofty knoll, southward of the present mansion; when this elevated situation was abandoned is not known, but the existing structure may lay claim to high antiquity. It is a large and venerable building with two deep wings and two towers, embattled, and supported at the angles by strong projecting buttresses; and is seated in the centre of a well-wooded park.

A district church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, and containing 1090 sittings, was erected in 1835, by Her Majesty's Commissioners, at a cost of £3000: it was originally a very plain edifice, but was greatly improved in 1845–6, when a new pulpit and reading-desk were put up, and numerous embellishments added to the timber-roof and other parts of the building, at a cost of £500, defrayed by the inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Hulme Trustees, who must present a graduate of Brasenose College, Oxford; net income, £150, with a commodious glebe-house. The ecclesiastical district or parish of All Saints, Habergham, was formed in 1845, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, c. 37, and consists of part of this township, with adjacent portions of other townships: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately; net income, £150. The church is situated near the village of Cheapside, and is in the early decorated style; it was built by subscription, and cost about £4000: the first stone was laid by J. P. Kay Shuttleworth, Esq., assisted by James Dugdale, Esq., on new-year's day, 1847. Another portion of Habergham-Eaves has been formed, under the same act, into the district of St. Paul, Lane-Bridge, which see. There are some places of worship for dissenters. Charles Townley, Esq., the distinguished virtuoso and collector of marbles, who died in 1805, was of the family connected with this place.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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