Gwennap (St. Wenap)

GWENNAP (St. Wenap), a parish, in the union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 8 miles (E.) from Truro; containing, with the chapelry of St. Day, 10,794 inhabitants. This parish abounds with copper and tin mines, worked upon a very extensive scale. Here are the Consolidated Mines, the largest in the kingdom; and the Tresavean mine, the proprietors of which share among them £30,000 per annum, after deducting all expenses, which may be regarded as a profit of £300 per annum on every original share of £25. The value of the produce of these and other mines in the parish, in 1840, was £293,218, and the total produce of the whole county in the same year amounted only to £819,949. In 1834, an act was obtained for making a railway from Hayle, in the parish of St. Erth, to the Tresavean mine, with several branches; and there are railways communicating with the north coast at Portreath, and with the south coast at Devran. Scorier House, the property of John Williams, Esq., contains a fine assortment of Cornish minerals, collected by that gentleman within the last 40 years, and valued at £30,000. The parish comprises 6565 acres, whereof 1641 are waste land or common. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 18. 11½.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the great tithes have been commuted for £255, and the vicarial for £420: the glebe consists of 69 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a detached tower; a gallery has been erected, by which 200 free sittings have been provided. At St. Day is a chapel, to which a district was assigned in 1835; and at Lannarth is a church dedicated to Christ. There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, and Wesleyans. On the southwest side of Gwennap Pit is a mountain called Karn Marth, upon whose summit is a large stone tumulus, or barrow, out of which two British urns were taken in 1789. On a mountain opposite to it, named Trebowling, is a very strong fortification, inclosing about an acre of ground encompassed by a ditch and rampart, nearly 20 feet high. There is also a very singular encampment in the grounds of Scorier House.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z