Gulval (St. Gulval)

GULVAL (St. Gulval), a parish, in the union of Penzance, W. division of the hundred of Penwith and of the county of Cornwall, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Penzance; containing 1941 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4350 acres, of which 750 are waste or common; the surface is varied, and from the higher grounds are fine views of the surrounding country, including St. Michael's Mount and Mount bay. The soil on the south side is of light sandy quality, and favourable for early vegetables, of which great quantities are raised for the supply of the town of Falmouth and neighbouring markets; the other parts of the parish have some good pasture and arable lands. A tannery is carried on to a considerable extent; and several mills are put in motion by a copious stream which rises in the northern part of the parish, and falls into Mount bay. The living is a vicarage, and valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the great tithes have been commuted for £268, and the small for £355; there is a vicarial glebe of 12 acres. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. At Rosemorren are the remains of a cromlech, near which several sculptured stones, earthen urns containing ashes, burnt bones, a celt, &c., have been found. There is a spring called Gulfwell, or the Hebrew Brook, formerly held in great veneration.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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