Groby

GROBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Ratby, union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Leicester; containing 42 inhabitants. There are some remains of a castle, which, together with Broadgate Park, where are the ruins of another mansion, was the ancient seat of the noble family of Grey. In 1337, Edward III. granted to Henry, Lord Ferrers, the privilege of a weekly market on Friday, and an annual fair on the eve of St. George and two following days, at the manor of Groby. The hamlet comprises 1778 acres; the soil is various, partly a strong clay, and partly gravel, and mostly good land. Groby Pool, one of the finest sheets of water in this part of the country, covers about 80 acres, is well stored with fish, and surrounded by woods. Extensive quarries of granite, or sienite, have been opened, communicating by a railway with the canals at Leicester: of this stone, which is very hard, great quantities have been sent for repairing the streets of the metropolis; and slate is also found. A church was consecrated in August, 1841. The place gives the title of Lord Grey of Groby to the Earl of Stamford and Warrington.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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