Greasborough

GREASBOROUGH, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish and union of Rotherham, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Rotherham; containing 1623 inhabitants. This district comprises by computation 2270 acres, the whole of which, with the exception of about 280 acres, is the property of the Earl Fitzwilliam. The surface is finely varied, rising into eminences of considerable elevation, and diversified by extensive woods; the substratum is rich in mineral produce, coal of excellent quality is extensively worked, and a productive ironstone-mine is in operation. The village is situated on a delightful eminence near Wentworth Park, part of which is in the township: the Greasborough canal and Midland railway pass through the township, and there is a branch line from the Sheffield and Rotherham railway to this place, opened in 1839. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, was built in 1828, at an expense of £6000, towards which the Parliamentary Commissioners granted £2000, and the Earl Fitzwilliam the remainder, together with the site; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and contains 1000 sittings, of which 400 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Earl Fitzwilliam, with a net income of £182; impropriator, the Earl of Effingham. The Independents and Wesleyans have places of worship. In various parts of the township the remains of a Roman road are distinctly visible; it crosses the village, and passes along the head of a fine piece of water intersected with islands, and covering 20 acres of land.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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