Grafton-Manor

GRAFTON-MANOR, an extra-parochial liberty, in the Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 1¾ mile (W. S. W.) from Bromsgrove; containing 55 inhabitants. This was originally a chapelry within the parish of Bromsgrove, and remained such until the reign of Henry III., when it was annexed to the cathedral of Worcester, and consequently became extra-parochial. It comprises 1353a. 1r. 24p., of which 786 acres are arable, 522 meadow, 41 wood, and nearly three water; the surface is rather undulated, and the soil generally heavy. The road from Birmingham to Worcester passes through, and at Bromsgrove is a station of the Birmingham and Gloucester railway. The ancient mansion of the earls of Shrewsbury, here, was nearly destroyed by fire in 1710; the only part now remaining entire is the banqueting-room, which is alone sufficient to attest its former splendour. A chapel shared the fate of the mansion-house, and continued a roofless ruin until 1808, when the late Earl of Shrewsbury restored it for Roman Catholic worship; the restoration, however, having been executed in a very inefficient manner, the edifice again underwent a thorough repair in 1819, at the joint expense of the earl, the incumbent, and the congregation. Benjamin Collett, Esq., has a lease of the mansion and manorial rights for a considerable time.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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