Gorton

GORTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Manchester; containing 2422 inhabitants, and comprising 1500 acres. This place is situated on the road to Mottram and Sheffield, and the inhabitants are chiefly employed in the cotton manufacture and in the making of hats. A sort of lime made here, called Ardwick lime, grows hard under water. The Manchester, Ashton, and Stockport canal, and the Manchester and Sheffield, and Manchester and Birmingham railways, pass through the chapelry. In the vale of Gorton is a reservoir 44 acres in extent, excavated by the Manchester Water-works' Company for the partial supply of that town. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150, with a glebehouse; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Manchester. The chapel, dedicated to St. Thomas, was rebuilt about 1756: it contains several old volumes, the gift of Humphrey Chetham, each volume fastened by a chain. There are places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, and Unitarians; and a school in union with the National Society.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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