Gorleston (St. Andrew)

GORLESTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk; containing 3779 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the North Sea and the river Yare, and on the north by South-Town, or Little Yarmouth, with which it now forms one parish, comprising 2300 acres, and reaching about three miles from its southern point to Yarmouth bridge over the Yare. A wooden pier (one of the finest in the kingdom) forms a breakwater towards the south, and the entrance to the Yare leading to the port of Yarmouth. Numerous pilots reside here, for vessels coming in and going out of the river; and there are lodging-houses for visiters, commanding a fine view of the pier, river, and sea, with accommodation for sea-bathing. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectories of South-Town and West-Town consolidated in 1520, valued in the king's books at £11; patron and incumbent, the Rev. F. Upjohn; impropriators, the landholders. The great tithes have been commuted for £243. 17., and the vicarial for £214. 15. The church is a large and ancient structure, consisting of a nave and north and south aisles, having separate roofs, all thatched; the old steeple, which had long been a landmark for vessels passing through the Yarmouth roads, was blown down in 1835. At SouthTown (which see) is a chapel dedicated to St. Mary. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. A priory of Augustine friars was founded in the reign of Edward I. by William Woodrove, and his wife Margaret; and an hospital for lepers was in existence at Gorleston in 1372.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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