Goodmanham (All Saints)

GOODMANHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 1¼ mile (N. E. by N.) from Market-Weighton; containing 316 inhabitants. This place is of very remote antiquity, and is supposed to have derived its name from the great Pagan temple of Northumbria, in the immediate vicinity of which, the high priest Coifi, being converted to Christianity, was baptized by Paulinus, who in 630 founded the church, which was built with the materials of the British temple. The site and extent of the latter seem clearly marked out by numerous artificial mounds called the Howes. Goodmanham is supposed by some antiquaries to have been the site of the Roman station Delgovitiæ, but this is disputed by others. The parish comprises by computation 3000 acres, of which 2500 are arable, 300 meadow and pasture, and about 200 plantation; the soil is a light loam resting upon chalk, the surface is undulated, and the scenery very picturesque. Stone is quarried for the roads. The village is pleasantly situated on one of the acclivities on the western side of the Wolds, upon the road leading from Market-Weighton to Driffield. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 11. 8.; net income, £477; patron, J. Clark, Esq. The tithes were commuted in 1775, for 721 acres of land, and there are 25 acres of glebe at Middleton; a handsome glebe-house was erected by the Rev. William Blow, in 1824. The church is a venerable structure in the early Norman style, with a square tower, and has four fine arches, and a curious and very celebrated font. At Eastrop was formerly a chapel of ease. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Over a chalybeate spring, much esteemed for its virtues, a house has been erected.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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