Golcar

GOLCAR, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (W. by S.) from Huddersfield; containing 3598 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1560 acres, of which the surface is boldly undulated, rising in steep acclivities from the banks of the river Colne: here are several quarries of excellent stone. The manufacture of coarse woollen-cloths and padding has long been established, and that of articles of the finest texture has since been introduced; the machinery of the numerous mills is propelled by 12 water-wheels and 12 steam-engines. The Huddersfield and Manchester canal skirts the township, which contains various hamlets scattered on the sides and summit of Golcar Hill. Commodious baths have been erected at a mineral spring on the course of the Colne, the waters having been found useful in rheumatism and other disorders. The chapel, now a district church, dedicated to St. John, was erected in 1829, at an expense of £2865, defrayed by the Parliamentary Commissioners, with the exception of £500 raised by subscription; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a tower surmounted by a spire, and contains 950 sittings, of which 430 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Huddersfield; net income, £150. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. Upon the high ground at the western extremity of the township was formerly a rocking-stone, so celebrated as to have been marked in old maps; and it is said there were other Druidical remains.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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