Godstone (St. Nicholas)

GODSTONE (St. Nicholas), a parish, and the head of a union, in the First division of the hundred of Tandridge, E. division of Surrey, 19 miles (S.) from London; containing 1896 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Croydon to East Grinstead, and comprises by computation 6380 acres. The soil is various, comprising chalk, sandy loam, and a stiffish clay; the surface is elevated, consisting, for the greater part, of a ridge extending from the chain of the Surrey hills. On the Chalk Hill, so called from its substratum, is a quarry of very durable stone, which is raised for building; and from another portion of the ridge, called Tilbuster Hill, is obtained gravel of excellent quality for the roads. The village of Godstone-Green is of considerable extent, and a large brewery is carried on there. The Godstone station of the South-Eastern railway is six miles from the Reigate station, and 27 from the London terminus. A weekly market, and an annual fair of three days' continuance were granted by Henry III. to John St. John; the latter only now exists as a pleasure-fair, and takes place on July 22nd and 23rd. The petty-sessions for the division are held here monthly. The living is a vicarage, styled, in the time of Henry VIII., Walkensted alias Godstone; patron and incumbent, the Venerable Archdeacon Hoare; impropriators, the Earl of Liverpool and Sir W. R. Clayton, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £540 payable to the vicar, and £412 to the impropriators; the vicar has a glebe of 11 acres. The church is a neat structure combining various styles, and in the middle of the south aisle has a low tower surmounted by a spire; it was enlarged in 1824. In a small chapel on the north side of the chancel, is a marble altar-tomb, on which are beautiful effigies of Sir John and Lady Evelyn; also another of white marble, to the memory of Jacob Evelyn. James Evelyn, Esq., of Fellbridge House, erected a chapel in 1787, and endowed it with £30 per annum; and in the populous district of Blindley Heath a neat church was erected by subscription in 1842, at a cost of £1800: it is in the early English style, is dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, and the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar, with a net income of £100. David Maynard in 1709 gave £200, producing £10 per annum, for instructing children; and James Evelyn, in 1783, endowed a school at Fellbridge. The poor law union of Godstone comprises 14 parishes, with a population of 11,459. Here is a mineral spring, now little used. At Leigh Place, where is a hill with an intrenchment on its summit, were formerly extensive powder-mills.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

Navigation

Preface
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z