Goadland, or Goathland

GOADLAND, or Goathland, a chapelry, in the parish and lythe of Pickering, union of Whitby, N. riding of York, 13½ miles (N. by E.) from Pickering; containing 381 inhabitants. In the dale of Goadland, within the ancient honour of Pickering Forest, the tenants were bound, by the tenure of their lands, to promote the breed of a large species of hawk that resorted to a cliff called Killing-Nab Scar, and to secure them for the king: these birds continue to haunt the same place, but it is remarkable that there is seldom more than one brood produced in a year. The township comprises by computation 11,030 acres, chiefly high moorland hills, and mostly waste: the lower vale, which at the northern end unites with the vale of Esk, is very picturesque; and the two moorland rivulets that meet at the upper end of it form the powerful stream of Goadland beck, abounding in romantic scenery, with occasional waterfalls of no mean beauty. The Whitby and Pickering railway passes near the school-house in the chapelry, and at a small distance attains its summit level, which is 520 feet above the Whitby terminus. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Dean of York, with a net income of £58; impropriator, G. Herbert, Esq. The chapel, a very ancient foundation, was rebuilt in 1821; the old font, supposed to be of Saxon origin, was lately discovered by Dr. Hibbert Wear in a farmyard, and is now set up in the church of St. Matthew at Grosmont. Here was a cell annexed to Whitby Abbey, and a farmhouse which is thought to occupy its site, goes by the name of Abbot House. Some British and Roman antiquities may be traced in the chapelry.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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