Glynde

GLYNDE, a parish, in the union of West Firle, hundred of Ringmer, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 3¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Lewes; containing 270 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the old road from Lewes to Eastbourne, comprises about 1370 acres; the surface is varied, and from the summit of Mount Caburn, the highest point of elevation, is a beautiful view of the Weald. Glynde Place is a handsome mansion, in the ancient English style of domestic architecture, situated in a tastefully-disposed demesne; and in the vicinity is Glyndbourn, another pleasing residence. The village is at the foot of Mount Caburn; a branch of the Ouse is navigable for barges within a small distance of it, and here is a station of the Brighton, Lewes, and Hastings railway. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 1. 3.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor: the great tithes have been commuted for £140, and the vicarial for £120; the glebe comprises 10 acres, with a house. The church is a very neat edifice with a campanile turret, erected in 1763, at the expense of Dr. Trevor, Bishop of Durham, who is buried here; the chancel is embellished with scriptural subjects in stained glass. About 16 children are educated for the interest of £100, bequeathed by Mary Trevor; and the dividends on £2000 Bank stock, left by Miss Hay, are distributed among the aged poor. Mount Caburn is a circular earthwork strongly intrenched, and to the west of it are the remains of a large square encampment; in the ravines of the downs, also, are numerous vestiges of antiquity. William Hay, the writer, was born at Glyndbourn, and was buried in the church in 1755.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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