Glandford Brigg or Bridge

GLANDFORD BRIGG or BRIDGE, a market-town and chapelry, and the head of a union, in the parish of Wrawby, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 24 miles (N. by E.) from Lincoln, and 153 (N. by W.) from London; containing 1822 inhabitants. This place, originally only a small fishing-hamlet, is now a well-built town, plentifully supplied with water from the river Ancholme, of which one branch runs through it, and another passes at the distance of a quarter of a mile westward: the bridge has lately been taken down, and a new one erected. A considerable trade is carried on in corn, coal, and timber; there are several fur-manufactories, tanneries, and fellmongers' establishments; and it is asserted that more persons are employed here in dressing rabbit-skins than in any other provincial town in the kingdom. A great improvement has been made by draining the Ancholme level, the expense of which is defrayed by a tax on land, and a duty on the tonnage of the river. The market is on Thursday, and a fair is held on August 5th. There are petty-sessions once a fortnight: the powers of the county debt-court of Brigg, established in 1847, extend over the greater part of the registration-district of Glandford-Brigg. The tithes were commuted for land under an inclosure act of the 39th and 40th George III. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was erected in 1699, at the expense of four gentlemen, who endowed it with certain estates vested in their respective heirs and the trustees of the free school; it was rebuilt in 1842, and is now a handsome edifice in the pointed style, with a tower 82 feet high, the whole erected at a cost of £3000, defrayed by subscription, aided by a grant from the Church Building Society. The Friends, Independents, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists, have each a place of worship; and there is a chapel for Roman Catholics. The free grammar school was founded in 1669, pursuant to the will of Sir John Nelthorpe, Bart., and is endowed with land producing £344 per annum. The poor law union comprises 52 parishes or places, and contains 29,828 inhabitants. In the reign of John, an hospital was founded here by Adam Paynel, which was a cell to the abbey of Selby, in Yorkshire; but all traces of it have disappeared.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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