Gayhurst (St. Peter)

GAYHURST (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from Newport-Pagnell, on the road to Northampton; containing, with the extra-parochial liberty of Gorefields, 116 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the east by the river Ouse, comprises about 894 acres, the greater part of a strong soil, with some of a shelly quality, resting on lime and other stone. Four-fifths of the land are pasture, and the remainder arable; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque, the higher grounds being well wooded. The living is a rectory, to which that of Stoke-Goldington was united in 1736, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 2½., and in the patronage of the Misses Wyndham; net income, £297, with a glebe-house. The church was rebuilt in 1728 by Mr. Wrighte, then lord of the manor; it is in the Grecian style, with a tower, and contains a handsome monument to Chancellor Wrighte. There is a chalybeate spring. Sir Edward Digby, one of the Gunpowder-plot conspirators, was proprietor of the estate; and in the mansion which he occupied, is shown a recess where he hid himself to escape being captured on the discovery of his treason.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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