Garston

GARSTON, a township and chapelry, in the parish of Childwall, union and hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, 5 miles (S. E.) from Liverpool; the township containing, with Aigburth, in 1846, 2436 inhabitants. At a very early period this place gave name to a local family, of whom Adam de Gerstan died in 1265; the Blackburnes, Irelands, Norrises, and Beauclerks subsequently possessed the property, which more recently came, by marriage, to the family of Hawkes. The township, which is beautifully situated on the Mersey, abounds with gentlemen's seats and villas, and commands fine views of the Cheshire hills and Welsh mountains. On the banks of the river are extensive works for refining salt; and at Otterspool is a rivulet flowing into the Mersey, near which is an oil-mill. An act was passed in 1846 to enable the St. Helen's Canal and Railway Company to make docks here, and construct a railway to Garston, nearly 7½ miles in length. Among the residences, is Grassendale House, with 20 acres of land, the property of George Hargreaves, Esq., who is also owner of Beach Lawn, occupied by W. J. Marrow, Esq.; and at Grassendale is the villa of J. Grant Morris, Esq. The living is a donative, made into an independent benefice in the 1st of George II., and paying no fees to Childwall; net income, £138, with a house; patron, Richard Watt, Esq. The tithes have been commuted for £160 payable to the Bishop of Chester's lessee, £35 to the vicar of the parish, and £5 to the minister of the chapelry. A neat place of worship for Wesleyans has been built at the expense of George Heald, Esq., of Garston Lodge, a handsome residence standing in its own grounds. There is also a national school.—See Aigburth.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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