Fulwood

FULWOOD, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish and union of Sheffield, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York. This district, which comprises the township of Upper Hallam with the exception of a very minute portion, nearly adjoins the town of Sheffield on the west, and is beautifully situated in the valley of the river Porter. The substratum contains sandstone, which is quarried for building and for the roads; and on the borders of the moors that bound the township to the west, are some quarries of good flagstone: there are also several coalpits. A portion of the inhabitants is employed in the manufacture of cutlery, and the cutting of files and saws: and on the banks of the river are two wheels, set in motion by the stream, which are used in the grinding process, and a forge for the conversion of iron into steel. The suburb is a favourite residence of the gentry of the town. The church, dedicated to Christ, and erected at an expense exceeding £2200 by Miss Silcock, of WhiteleyWood Hall, by whom also the living is endowed, is a handsome structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains nearly 300 sittings, exclusively of the galleries, which have been added since its consecration in 1838, at a cost of £300: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Miss Silcock, and there is an excellent parsonage-house. The Independents and Wesleyans have places of worship.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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