Fulmer (St. James)

FULMER (St. James), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Stoke, county of Buckingham, 2 miles (S.) from Gerrard's Cross; containing 355 inhabitants. This place derives its name from a mere or lake in the lower grounds, which was abundantly supplied with water, but which now forms water-cress grounds. It was formerly a chapelry to the rectory of Datchet, but was separated and made distinct in the reign of Edward VI. The parish comprises 1633 acres, of which about 300 are a wild open common, and the remainder good arable and pasture land; the common bears a considerable quantity of underwood, affording fuel for the poor. The living is a rectory not in charge; net income, £285; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The church, rebuilt on a more commodious site by Sir Marmaduke Darrell in 1630, is a handsome edifice of brick, with coigns and facings of stone, and contains an elegant monument with the recumbent figures of Sir Marmaduke and his lady.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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