Frodingham, North (St. Elgin)

FRODINGHAM, NORTH (St. Elgin), a parish, in the union of Driffield, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Driffield; containing 831 inhabitants. It comprises about 3000 acres, of which 300 are grass-land, 9 wood, and the remainder arable. The soil is a strong clay, and the surface level, with occasional remarkable diluvial elevations, formed of sand and gravel, and provincially called "barfs;" there are also some carrs, composed of vegetable remains, which, previous to draining, formed considerable lakes. The village is well built, and consists chiefly of a number of detached houses, forming one long street; it is situated about half a mile eastward from the navigable river Hull, over which is a bridge. Frodingham had the privilege of a weekly market; but its ancient charter was transferred, about eighty years ago, to Driffield, in consequence of the superior locality of that town for the purposes of trade: fairs, however, are held for pedlery, &c., on July 10th and October 2nd. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the patronage of the Rev. Francis Drake, with a net income of £170; impropriator, P. Saltmarshe, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1801. The church is a very ancient structure, with a tower of chaste design; but the beauty of the whole edifice was injured by the last reparation, in 1816. There are places of worship for Independents and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. A silver coin of Edward the Confessor was found on the glebe-farm, in digging a well, in 1833.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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