Frickley, with Clayton (All Saints)

FRICKLEY, with Clayton (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 8 miles (W. N. W.) from Doncaster; containing 316 inhabitants. This place is chiefly remarkable as the seat of the family of Anne, of whom mention first occurs in the time of Edward II. and III., when Sir William Anne took a considerable part in public affairs, greatly aiding in the suppression of the rebellion of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and afterwards serving in parliament: the family ceased to have any connexion with Frickley towards the close of the last century. The parish comprises 1640 acres, of which rather more than one-half is arable, and about 20 acres are woodland; of the soil, one-third is a tenacious clay, and the remainder rests on an inferior gritstone. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Clayton annexed; net income, £69; patron and impropriator, St. A. Warde, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1814. The church is a small ancient structure, with a tower, and is supposed to have been surrounded by a village which has disappeared: in the interior are some cylindrical columns, and between the nave and chancel is a handsome Norman arch. There is a place of worship used by various denominations of dissenters. An old chapel, erected at the period of the Commonwealth, and then used for divine service, has been rebuilt by the incumbent, for a day and Sunday school.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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