Frampton (St. Bartholomew)

FRAMPTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Dorchester, liberty of Frampton, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Dorchester, and 130 (S. W.) from London; containing 391 inhabitants. The name of this place originally belonged to the site of an ancient priory, and is derived from the river Frome, which passes by; in Domesday book it is written Frantone, and when that record was compiled, the priory was a cell to the abbey of St. Stephen, at Caen, in Normandy. A market, on Thursday, now disused, was granted by Edward III., and four fairs by succeeding monarchs; of the latter, two are still held, on March 9th and May 4th, for cattle, horses, &c. There are courts leet and baron annually, at which the constable and tythingmen for the liberty are appointed. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 9. 7., and in the gift of the family of Sheridan, the impropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £453. 5. 6., and the vicarial for £3. 6. 8., with a glebe comprising 68 acres, and a glebe-house. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with an embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, erected in 1695, by Robert Brown, to replace a tower which had fallen down. The pulpit is ornamented with three carved figures in niches: one of these is much defaced; the other two represent monks, one holding the sun in his right hand and a book in his left, the other a cross and a book. The entire edifice has been altered and repaired.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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