Fownhope (St. Mary)

FOWNHOPE (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Greytree, union and county of Hereford, 6 miles (S. E.) from Hereford; containing, with the chapelry of Fawley, 1004 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 3700 acres, of which nearly 1000 are coppice-wood; the surface is varied and picturesque, and from the summit of Capler Hill, which is finely wooded, the prospects are extensive. There are quarries of coralline limestone used for burning, and of sandstone of good quality for building. The village is situated on the eastern bank of the Wye, the road from Hereford to Newent passing through it. Petty-sessions for the division are held every fourth Monday. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 9½., and endowed with one-third of the rectorial tithes; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Hereford. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £320, the vicarial for £160; and there are about 70 acres of glebe, of which one-half belongs to the rectory, and the other half to the vicarage. The church, a large and wellbuilt edifice, exhibits traces of the Norman, early English, and decorated styles; a Norman tower supports a more recent shingled spire of considerable elevation. There is a chapel of ease at Fawley. About half a mile to the north of the village is an eminence crowned by an ancient camp; and at some distance, on Capler Hill, is a second camp, double trenched, and called Woldbury.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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