Fotheringay (St. Mary and All Saints)

FOTHERINGAY (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Willybrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (N. N. E.) from Oundle; containing 230 inhabitants. This place was once celebrated for its castle, a strong and handsome structure with double ditches, keep, &c. In the reign of Henry III., when the many strongholds encouraged the nobility to rebel, it was surprised by William, Earl of Albemarle, who laid waste the surrounding country. It was the birthplace of Richard III., the scene of the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, and the place of her execution. James I., on his accession to the throne, demolished it; but the site may still be traced. The parish is bounded on the south and east by the river Nene, and consists of 2112a. 3r. 23p. The Northampton and Peterborough railway passes through. The village, in which a fair for horses is held on the third Monday after July 5th, was anciently a considerable town, and is pleasantly situated on the river, over which is a bridge of freestone, erected in 1722 by the Marquess of Halifax, in lieu of a wooden one built in 1573 by Queen Elizabeth. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of Samuel Jones Loyd, Esq.; net income, £150. The church is a handsome edifice in the later English style, containing an ancient carved-oak pulpit, and a very fine font: several distinguished members of the Plantagenet family are interred here. It was formerly collegiate, and at one period the church of a nunnery, the inmates of which were translated to De la Pré, near Northampton. On the north side of the church is a free grammar school for boys, endowed by Queen Elizabeth with a house and £20 per annum. Edmund of Langley, son of Edward III., procured a licence to erect a college, and his son Edward founded and endowed the establishment, upon which Henry V. bestowed certain lands that belonged to alien priories; Edward IV. made the college of his own foundation, and enlarged the buildings. At the Dissolution its revenue amounted to about £419.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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