Fordington (St. George)

FORDINGTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, liberty of Fordington, Dorchester division of Dorset; adjoining the borough of Dorchester, and containing 2937 inhabitants. This place derived its name from a ford over the Frome, across which river are now several bridges in the neighbourhood. In the 29th of Edward III., Queen Isabel procured the grant of a market on Tuesday, and a fair on the eve, day, and morrow of St. George. The parish surrounds the whole of Dorchester, and comprises by measurement about 4000 acres, whereof the greater part is arable, and the remainder pasture; the soil is chiefly a light marl, on a chalky stratum. There are some factories for weaving woollen-cloth, employing upwards of fifty hands; and an iron-foundry is carried on. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15; net income, £225; patron, the Prebendary of Fordington in the Cathedral of Salisbury. The church was founded about 1400, but only a small portion of the original structure now remains; it is a cruciform edifice, partly Norman and partly of English architecture, with a porch in which is some rude sculpture. Christchurch, at West Fordington, was consecrated in 1846. In the parish are many barrows, some of them very large; and Roman coins are frequently ploughed up. In 1747, above 200 skeletons, the supposed remains of persons who fell in the Danish wars, were discovered at the depth of four or five feet; they were re-interred in the churchyard, or in pits dug on the spot.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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