Fladbury (St. John the Baptist)

FLADBURY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Pershore, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Evesham; comprising the chapelries of Stock with Bradley, Throckmorton, and Wyre-Piddle, and the hamlets of Abbot'sLench, and Hill with Moor; and containing 1448 inhabitants, of whom 425 are in the township of Fladbury. This parish, which is delightfully situated in the Vale of Evesham, comprises 6396 acres of land, principally arable, whereof 1448a. 16p. are in Fladbury township. It is bounded for its whole length, on the south, by the Avon; the soil is richly fertile, and the scenery beautiful. The village is not surpassed for opulence and respectability by any of its size in the county; it is pleasantly seated on the river, which is navigable from the Severn, affording facilities for the conveyance of coal and other supplies, and over which is a ferry at this place. The road from Worcester to Evesham, and the Oxford, Worcester, and Wolverhampton railway, intersect the parish. The principal seat is Craycombe House, about a mile north of the village, standing in a sheltered situation, and commanding a fine view of the winding Avon.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £81. 10., and in the gift of the Bishop of Worcester: the tithes have been commuted for £500, and the glebe comprises 700 acres, with a house. The church, built about 600 years ago, is in the early English style, with a tower, of which the lower portion is very ancient; the interior has been considerably altered and improved of late years, and in the chancel is a marble monument to Bishop Lloyd, who died in 1717. There are chapels at Bradley, Throckmorton, and Wyre-Piddle, which are stipendiary curacies, paid by the rector. A neat day and Sunday school, with a house for the master, was erected in 1841, by E. T. Perrott, Esq., at a cost of nearly £500. In the reign of Ethelred, a society of religious persons was established here, subordinate to the church at Worcester.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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