Fishwick

FISHWICK, a township, in the borough, parish, and union of Preston, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire; containing 756 inhabitants. The manor was in the possession of the Dacre family in the reign of Edward I.; and in that of Henry VIII. was held by the Asshetons, whose heiress brought it to the Hoghtons, by whom it was sold to the family of Shaw, about eighty years ago. The township, which on the west adjoins Preston, and is bordered by the river Ribble on the east and south, comprises 672a. 3r. 30p., the chief part in meadow, pasture, and market-gardens. Until about the beginning of the present century, it formed a calm and rural retreat between Preston and Walton-le-Dale; but its rural character was broken in upon in its northern part, by the increasing cottages of New Preston, and manufactories and other buildings have spread extremely in that direction. Fishwick cotton-mill, belonging to the firm of Swainson, Birley, and Company, is the largest in the kingdom under one roof: the building is 158 yards in length, 18 yards in width, and seven stories high; and contains 600 windows, and 32,500 panes of glass. In this vast establishment 50,000 mule spindles, 19,000 throstle spindles, and 1000 looms are at work, employing 1300 hands. The Bank-Top cotton-mill, belonging to Richard Riley, Esq., contains 400 looms, and employs 425 persons. Both of these factories were commenced in 1824. The great tithes have been commuted for £21, and the small for £17. In the township are a petrifying, and a chalybeate, spring.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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