Fetcham

FETCHAM, a parish, in the union of Epsom, Second division of the hundred of Copthorne and Effingham, W. division of Surrey, 1¼ mile (W.) from Leatherhead; containing 373 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north-east by the river Mole, and comprises by computation 1800 acres, of which 1300 are arable, 400 pasture, and 100 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 10. 5.; net income, £363; patron, the Rev. R. Downes. The church is an ancient structure of flints, pebbles, chalk, and Roman tiles, and, though now small, appears to have been formerly large and cruciform: in 1838, the Rev. J. Craig, then rector, considerably increased the accommodation, and, with J. B. Hankey, Esq., of Fetcham Park, in which the church is situated, beautified the interior. A parochial school was established in the same year. Sir George Shiers bequeathed in 1690 a rent-charge of £24. 2., for apprenticing children, and other charitable purposes; and Henry Smith left 27½ acres of land for the use of the poor. The bones of about 20 human bodies were found in 1758; and on the top of a hill, other bones have been discovered, supposed to be the remains of Saxons killed in the pursuit of the Danes after the battle of Ockley, in 851; which seems to be countenanced by the name of Standard Hill having been given to a neighbouring eminence.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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