Ferry-Bridge

FERRY-BRIDGE, a post-town, in the parish of Ferry-Frystone, union of Barwick (under Gilbert's act), Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 21½ miles (S. S. W.) from York. This place takes its name from the erection of a handsome stone bridge over the river Aire, in lieu of an ancient ferry, the possession of which was strongly contested by the rival armies of York and Lancaster, and near which numerous skeletons, fragments of armour, and military relics have been found at various times. The town derived its chief importance from its situation on the great thoroughfare from the north to the south of England, but since the opening of the railway, that traffic has been diverted into another channel; the houses are well built, and near the bridge are some extensive wharfs, whence goods are forwarded by the Aire and Calder navigation. Here are also large glassworks. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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