Felkirk (St. Peter)

FELKIRK (St. Peter), a parish, in the wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Barnsley; containing with the townships of Brierley, Havercroft with Cold Hiendley, South Hiendley, and Shafton, 1186 inhabitants. It comprises about 5880 acres, of which nearly 2830 are arable, 2460 grassland, 185 wood, 250 common, and 155 waste, roads, canal, and buildings. The surface is boldly undulated, swelling occasionally into lofty hills; the soil is generally fertile, though in some places strong land prevails. There are quarries of good sandstone, which is used for building and other purposes; and at Shafton a coal-mine is in operation, the vein of which is four feet and a half thick. The Barnsley canal and the Midland railway intersect each other in the western part of the parish, and proceed for some distance through Havercroft and Cold Hiendley. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 1. 10½., and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York, the appropriator; net income, £136. The church, situated on gently rising ground, is a handsome edifice in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, the arch beneath which is supported by two ancient pillars, whose capitals are beautifully ornamented with figures in the Saxon style; in the interior is the sepulchral chapel of the viscounts Galway. A parochial school is endowed with £17 per annum; and there are several bequests for distribution among the poor.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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