Farthingstone (St. Mary)

FARTHINGSTONE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. W.) from Weedon-Beck; containing 315 inhabitants. It comprises 1970 acres, whereof 600 are arable, 1100 pasture, and 270 woodland. The soil varies, but is generally of a good quality for wheat, barley, and beans, which are the principal produce; and the scenery is diversified with hills and woods, the prevailing timber being ash, elm, and oak. The village is seated on a ridge running from east to west. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 18. 11½.; net income, about £250; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln: the glebe consists of 197 acres. The church is situated near the centre of the village. On the brow of a hill in the north-eastern extremity of the parish, is an intrenchment with a lofty keep mount, named Castle Dykes, supposed to have been one of the numerous forts erected in Mercia in 913, and to have been destroyed by the Danes under Sweyn in 1013. Upon the declivity of a continuous hill is an area of irregular form, called the Castle-Yard, with trenches on all sides except the south-west; and in a field which has been recently cleared of wood, and brought under tillage, about a furlong south-west of Castle Dykes, the remains of a quadrilateral intrenchment, probably a castra æstiva of the Romans, have been discovered.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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