Farnley

FARNLEY, a chapelry, in that part of the parish of St. Peter, Leeds, which is within the liberty of Leeds, though locally in the wapentake of Morley, union of Leeds, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Leeds; containing 1530 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2200 acres, nearly encompassed by rivulets flowing through deep valleys. The neighbourhood abounds with iron-ore and coal, of both which there are several mines in operation; and the quarries of Park Spring produce stone of excellent quality, whereof considerable quantities are sent to London. The new line of road from Leeds to Halifax, by which the distance between those places is shortened to 14½ miles, intersects the chapelry. The village is extensive, and many of the inhabitants are employed in the woollen manufacture. The chapel, rebuilt in 1760, is a good edifice, containing 300 sittings: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Leeds, with a net income of £204; appropriators, the Dean and Canons of ChristChurch, Oxford, whose tithes have been commuted for £300. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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