Falkingham, or Folkingham (St. Andrew)

FALKINGHAM, or Folkingham (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish, in the union of Bourne, wapentake of Aveland, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 26 miles (S. S. E.) from Lincoln, and 106 (N. by W.) from London; containing 820 inhabitants. The origin of this town is attributed to the baronial residence of Gilbert de Gaunt, son of the Earl of Flanders, and nephew of Matilda, queen of William the Conqueror; accompanying that monarch in his expedition against England, he was rewarded for his services with 113 lordships in the county of Lincoln, of which he made this place the head. Of the ancient castle, neither the time of its erection nor of its demolition is known, and the only vestiges now remaining are the inner, and some faint traces of the outer, moat, which latter inclosed an area of nearly ten acres. The parish is intersected by the road from Stamford to Lincoln, and, with the ancient parish of Laughton, comprises 2996a. 3r. 33p., of which 1765 acres are meadow, 1224 arable, and 6 woodland; the soil is partly clay, and partly loam. The town is pleasantly situated on the south side of a gently sloping hill, and on approaching it in that direction has an appearance strikingly prepossessing; the houses are in general well built, the streets paved, and the inhabitants amply supplied with water from several fine springs. There is a small market on Thursday; and fairs are held on Ash-Wednesday, Palm-Monday, May 12th, and November 22nd, for horned-cattle, sheep, and horses, and on the Thursday after Old Michaelmas-day, exclusively for sheep. In 1808, a house of correction was built on the site of the castle, at an expense of £6600, defrayed by a rate on the county; and in 1825 it was considerably enlarged, at an additional expense of £8000. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Laughton united, valued in the king's books at £21. 12. 3½.; net income, £511; patron, Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Bart. The church, a spacious and handsome structure principally in the later English style, consists of a nave, chancel, and two aisles, with a lofty and richly embattled tower crowned by eight pinnacles; the chancel, which is of earlier date than the rest of the church, was repaired in 1825. The free school was founded in 1713, by Richard Brocklesby, clerk, who bequeathed the proceeds of an undivided moiety of fifty acres of land for the maintenance of a master; and a further sum of £10 per annum has since been left for the same purpose. There are also, a sum of £27 yearly, arising from a bequest of land by Thomas Arpe, Esq., for distribution among the poor; and some charitable bequests for clothing children.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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