Eynesford (St. Martin)

EYNESFORD (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Dartford, hundred of Axton, Dartford, and Wilmington, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 6 miles (S.) from Dartford; containing, with part of the hamlet of Crockenhill, 1313 inhabitants. This place takes its name from a ford across the Darent, on the east bank of which river are the remains of a castle, thought to have been erected about the time of the Conquest, by the family of De Eynesford: the walls inclose an area of about three-quarters of an acre, and were surrounded by a moat, now dry; in an adjoining garden are the foundations of some buildings supposed to have been connected with the castle. The parish comprises about 3500 acres, of which nearly 500 are woodland. The soil on the east side of the river is a strong clay, alternated with shingle and flints, and on the western side is of superior quality; the surface is very hilly, and the scenery pleasing. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12, and has a net income of £410; there is also a sinecure rectory, valued at £12. 16. 8., with a net income of £150: the Archbishop of Canterbury appoints the rector, and the rector presents to the vicarage. The church is a cruciform structure in the early Norman style, with a tower at the west end, surmounted by a spire, together 100 feet in height; under the tower is an arched doorway of great antiquity, bearing a strong resemblance to the Saxon style. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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