Eston-in-Cleveland

ESTON-in-Cleveland, a chapelry, in the parish of Ormesby, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (W. N. W.) from Guisborough; containing 285 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book Astune, was one of the manors granted at an early period to the Meinells of Whorlton Castle, and was held by the archbishop of Canterbury, by the service of Pantler on the day of his consecration: the families of Conyers and Stapylton afterwards possessed the property; and at one period some of the lands were owned by the monks of Guisborough and of Fountains. The chapelry comprises by computation 1870 acres. The village, situated on the Stockton and Redcar road, lies at the base of a detached hill of considerable elevation, called Eston Moor, which terminates in a bold promontory called Eston Nab, where a telegraphic beacon, or watch-house, has been erected. On the summit of the promontory is an encampment, conjectured to be of Saxon origin, of the date 492, and coeval with the battle of Badon Hill, which was fought in the neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Ormesby: a rent-charge of £320. 15. is payable to the Archbishop of York. The chapel is a very ancient edifice.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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