Enstone (St. Kenelm)

ENSTONE (St. Kenelm), a parish, in the union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford; containing, with the hamlets of Clevely, Gagingwell, Lidstone, and Radford, 1121 inhabitants, of whom 378 are in Neat-Enstone hamlet, and 237 in Church-Enstone, 15¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Oxford. The parish comprises by measurement 6064 acres, of which nearly the whole is arable. Some ingenious water-works were constructed here by Thomas Bushel, servant to Lord Bacon, which were visited by Charles I. and his consort, who named the rock from which the spring issues "Henrietta." The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 14. 4.; net income, £357; patron, Lord Dillon; appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church is a spacious and substantial structure, in the early English style, with some Norman portions; in a chamber above the south porch are several pieces of armour, which probably belonged to the troops raised here during the parliamentary war. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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