Elvaston (St. Bartholomew)

ELVASTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Derby; containing 518 inhabitants. This place was the scene of depredations committed by the parliamentarian forces, under Sir John Gell, in 1643, when Elvaston Castle, the seat of Lady Stanhope, was partly destroyed. The parish is situated on the river Derwent, and intersected by the road from Derby to London; and comprises about 2600 acres, of which oneseventh is arable. The soil is a rich loam resting upon gravel, inclining in those parts near the river to a stiffish clay; a mile from the river, the depth of the soil is from three to five feet: the surface is a dead level. There are some mines of plaster, but not now wrought. The Burrow-Ash station of the Midland railway abuts on the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 3. 9.; net income, £155; patron, the Earl of Harrington, who is lord of the manor, and owner of nearly the whole parish. The glebe comprises 43¾ acres, situated in Draycott, three miles distant; with three acres around the glebe-house, which is a good residence. The church is an ancient structure, with the original screen and rood-loft between the nave and chancel still remaining. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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