Ellel, North and South

ELLEL, NORTH and SOUTH, a chapelry, in the parish of Cockerham, union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Lancaster, on the road to Garstang and Preston; containing 2223 inhabitants. The manor of Ellel appears to have been a member of that of Warton, after the Norman Conquest. William Fitz-Gilbert, who first assumed the name of Lancaster, gave to Grimbald de Ellale, with other lands, two carucates in Ellale, to be held by knight's service. A Jordan de Ellal was forester of Wyresdale, and having married Alice de Thweng, a descendant of the house of Lancaster, left a daughter and heiress, who married Sir William de Molyneux, of Sefton, before the reign of Edward III., in which reign, Sir John de Coupeland appears as a proprietor. The Thwengs had possession long after this period, and Sir James Lawrence subsequently; the estates are now chiefly freehold in various hands.

The chapelry comprises 5620a. 1r. 38p., whereof threefourths are meadow and pasture, and the remainder arable. The surface is elevated and undulating, the soil various and generally productive and the scenery very fine; from the higher parts are extensive views of Morecambe bay, the town of Fleetwood, the Lake mountains, and the rivers Wyre and Lune. The Conder and Cocker rivers, the Lancaster and Preston canal, and Lancaster and Preston railway, run through; the last having two stations, and passing over two high viaducts. Ellel Hall, built about 70 years ago, is, with 500 acres of land, the property of Abraham Rawlinson Ford, Esq. Foxholes, with 150 acres, is the seat of William Talbot Rothwell, Esq. The latter house was nearly rebuilt in 1847, from the designs of Mr. Richard Lane, of Manchester, in the style of the domestic architecture of the 16th century; and the lights and shadows arising from the irregularity of its plan, give to the edifice much of the picturesque effect so characteristic of that period. The principal front is about 100 feet in length, and is ornamented with richly-carved barge-boards and pendent gables; the entrance consists of an arcade of three Tudor arches, and opens into a large lofty hall with a groined ceiling, having a noble gallery supported by carved Gothic brackets. This hall is replete with articles of vertu and marble statuary brought from abroad by the proprietor: an oak screen separates the staircase, which is also of oak; and the windows are of rich painted glass. Hay Carr, with 200 acres, all planted round, is the property of William Lamb, Esq.; the house has been much enlarged. There are several quarries of good stone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £140, with a house, built in 1840. The chapel, a plain structure, is situated in the hamlet of Galgate, which see. A school is endowed with £8 per annum.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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