Elland-Cum-Greetland

ELLAND-CUM-GREETLAND, a township and chapelry, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Halifax; the township containing 6479 inhabitants. Elland was anciently of considerable importance, and in the reign of Edward II. had a grant of a weekly market and two annual fairs: it was for many years the only chartered market-town in an extensive district, had a cloth-hall of its own, and for a long period was superior to Halifax for the extent of its various manufactures; but at present it has no market. The township comprises by computation 3388 acres. The population is chiefly employed in the spinning of worsted, and the manufacture of coarse woollen-cloths: several collieries are in operation; stone of good quality for building is quarried, and large quantities of bricks and black earthenware are made, for which clay is obtained in abundance; there are also some copperas-works. The village is situated on the south side of the vale of Calder, over which river is a handsome stone bridge; it is spacious and well built, and, together with the hamlet of Greetland, is lighted with gas from works erected in 1836 at an expense of £6000, by a proprietary of £10 shareholders. On the north side of the river is the Calder and Hebble navigation; and the Manchester and Leeds railway passes to the north of the village, near which it is carried through a tunnel 410 yards in length. A fair is held on the first Monday after the 12th of August. The chapel is an ancient structure with a tower, and consists of a nave, one aisle, and a chancel; in the east window are the armorial bearings of John of Gaunt. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150, with a house; patron, the Vicar of Halifax. The tithes of the township were commuted for land in 1803. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. A school was founded in 1734, by Mrs. Grace Ramsden, who endowed it with an estate now producing a rent of £63. 10. Near the village is the "Spa Well," the water of which holds in solution sulphuretted hydrogen and a free alkali; and at Greetland is a similar spring, called Upper Elliston's Farm Well.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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