Edmondbyers (St. Edmund)

EDMONDBYERS (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Weardale, W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Shotley-Bridge; containing, with the chapelry of Hunstonworth, 1014 inhabitants, of whom 458 are in the township of Edmondbyers. This parish, which is situated on the road from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, viâ Shotley-Bridge, to Stanhope, and bounded on the north and east by the river Derwent, comprises about 5000 acres, of which 2168 are arable, producing excellent crops of wheat, barley, and oats, and the remainder moorland. Lead-ore is found, and one of the earliest mills for fusing it was established by the Blacket family in the reign of Charles II.; the London Lead Company erected works here in 1800, and two mines recently opened are now in full operation. Stone of excellent quality for building is quarried to a great extent, for the supply of the neighbouring district. The Pontop and South Shields railway passes on the east. The village consists of cottages scattered round a small green, on the descent of a hill washed by the Birdenhope beck, which falls into the Derwent; the houses are of stone raised from the quarries of the place. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 4., and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Durham, with a gross income of £230, including the rent of a glebe of 121 acres: the tithes of Edmondbyers township have been commuted for £141. The church is a neat edifice in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, the latter supported on short buttresses. At Hunstonworth is a distinct incumbency. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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