Edington (All Saints)

EDINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 3¾ miles (E. N. E.) from Westbury; containing, with the tythings of Baynton, West Coulston, and Tinhead, 1136 inhabitants, of whom 475 are in the tything of Edington. The bishops of Salisbury had a palace here, which was plundered and destroyed during the rebellion of Jack Cade, in 1450, when Bishop Ayscough was dragged from the altar of his chapel, where he was officiating at mass, and stoned to death on a neighbouring hill. The parish comprises 5698a. 2r. 25p., of which 3354 acres are pasture, 2307 arable, and 37 woodland. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £87; patron and impropriator, George Watson Taylor, Esq. The church, a handsome cruciform structure with a tower rising from the intersection, is rich in many portions of its architecture, both within and without, and contains some beautiful sepulchral erections of an early date. William de Edington, whose paternal name is supposed to have been Cheney, a native of this place, and successively bishop of Winchester, lord high treasurer, and lord high chancellor, in the reign of Edward III., partly rebuilt the church, in which a strong similarity appears to the works executed by him at Winchester cathedral. He also founded a college, about 1347, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, St. Catherine, and All Saints, consisting of a dean and twelve ministers, for whom were substituted, at the desire of the Black Prince, in 1358, a reformed order of Augustine friars, called Bonhommes, under the government of a rector: its revenue at the suppression was estimated at £521. 12. 5. A portion of the monastic buildings is remaining, formerly the residence of the dukes of Bolton.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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