Edenfield

EDENFIELD, a parochial chapelry, in the township of Tottington Higher-End, parish of Bury, union of Haslingden, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (N.) from Bury, on the road to Haslingden and Burnley. The surface is hilly (being part of what is called the Back-bone of England); the soil chiefly clay, except in the valley, where it is alluvial; and the scenery singularly wild. There are two coal-mines, and extensive quarries of flagstone, and of slate-stone. Ten cotton-mills are in operation; also two woollen-mills, two calico-printing works, three fulling-mills, two paper-mills, and a cornmill; in which nearly the whole population is employed. The river Irwell and the East Lancashire railway pass through the chapelry, the latter having a branch to Rawtenstall and Bacup. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector of Bury, with a net income of £150. The present chapel was built in 1778, with the exception of the tower, built in 1614; a gallery was erected in 1829. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have places of worship; and an endowment of £17 per annum is applied to the education of children. The lands in the chapelry are under the copyhold tenure of the honour of Clitheroe.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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