Eddington

EDDINGTON, with Hidden and Newtown, a tything, in the parish and union of Hungerford, hundred of Kintbury-Eagle, county of Berks, 1 mile (N. E. by E.) from Hungerford; containing 512 inhabitants, and comprising 1330a. 22p. It is probable that this place was the Ethandune of the Saxon Chronicle, where Alfred is recorded to have obtained a decisive victory over the Danes, in 878, though Camden and others have fixed the scene of that contest at Eddington, near Westbury, in Wiltshire. Roman moulds for coining, some of them inclosing the metal itself, have been found here, and deposited in the Ashmolean Museum; they have the impressions of Severus and Caracalla, and their empresses, Julia and Plantilla. Near the spot has also been discovered a tessellated pavement.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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