Eccleshill

ECCLESHILL, a township, in the parish of Bradford, union of Carlton (under Gilbert's act), wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bradford; containing 3008 inhabitants. The township continued to form part of the ancient parish of Dewsbury for many years after the parish of Bradford had been separated from it; it contains 1209a. 3r. 34p., of which about 1000 acres are arable, and 200 moorland inclosed in 1842. Clay of fine quality for earthenware, and also for fire and common bricks, and drainingtiles, is abundant; and there is an extensive pottery, established in 1836: the substratum also contains coal, whereof several mines are in operation, and freestone, which is quarried for building. Eccleshill Hall is a handsome and ancient mansion of stone, commanding some fine views of the adjacent country. The village is situated on an eminence, and its inhabitants are chiefly employed in the woollen manufacture, for which there are three mills. Apperley-Bridge, in the township, is at the base of a verdant hill, on the south side of the Aire; on the bank of the river, are a dye-house, and an extensive corn-mill. The Leeds and Liverpool canal passes through the township. A church, dedicated to St. Luke, was erected in 1846, on a site given by George Baron, Esq., at an expense of £2000, of which £1000 were a grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a neat structure in the early English style, with a tower and spire, and contains 700 sittings, of which one-third are free; the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Bradford. There are places of worship for Independents, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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