Easingwould (All Saints)

EASINGWOULD (All Saints), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Raskelf, 2719 inhabitants, of whom 2171 are in the town, 13 miles (N. N. W.) from York, and 208 (N. N. W.) from London. The town is pleasantly situated on the south-western side of the Howardian hills; it is irregularly built, and from its inland situation, and the want of navigable conveyance, has been precluded from the advantages of trade. Considerable quantities of bacon and butter are, however, sent to York, whence the articles are forwarded to London. The York and Newcastle railway passes through a portion of the parish, and at Raskelf and Alne are stations on its line, the latter about 3 miles distant. The market is on Friday; fairs are held on July 6th and Sept. 26th, for cattle and sheep. The powers of the county debt-court of Easingwould, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Easingwould. The parish comprises by measurement, exclusively of Raskelf, 6528 acres, of which 4437 are arable, 1526 meadow and pasture, 155 woodland, and 410 common recently inclosed. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 11. 0½.; net income, £205; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Chester. The church, supposed to have been built in the 15th century, is situated on an eminence above the town, and commands an extensive view of the ancient forest of Galtres, and the vale of Mowbray. At Raskelf is a chapel; and there are places of worship in the parish for Independents, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists; also a Roman Catholic chapel. A free school was founded in 1781, by Mrs. Eleanor Westerman, who endowed it with £2500 reduced annuities; and another school has a small endowment. There are several almshouses for poor women, and various sums for distribution to the poor in bread, for apprenticing children, and the encouragement of deserving housekeepers. The union of Easingwould comprises 29 parishes or places, of which 28 are in the county of York, and one in the county of Durham; and contains a population of 11,323. In the neighbourhood of the town are some small chalybeate springs issuing from the high grounds.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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