Easebourne (St. Margaret)

EASEBOURNE (St. Margaret), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 1 mile (N. E.) from Midhurst; containing 1074 inhabitants. The village is situated near the Rother or Arundel navigation, and on the road from London to Chichester, viâ Midhurst. The living is a lay vicarage and perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8.; the patronage and impropriation belong to the Earl of Egmont: net income of the minister, £118. The church is in the early and later English styles, and consists of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a tower surmounted by a spire; in the chancel is an altar-tomb, on which is a recumbent figure of a man in armour. There is a small Roman Catholic chapel. The workhouse for the union is situated in the parish. In the latter part of the reign of Henry III., John Bohun, of Midhurst, founded here a small Benedictine nunnery, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was £29 per annum: the remains were in 1839 converted into a good house and out-offices; and on part of the site is a beautiful sepulchral chapel in the early Norman style, in which are monuments to several members of the families of Montague and Poyntz. Queen Elizabeth, who was entertained at Cowdray, in the vicinity, in 1590, dined at the nunnery.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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