Dymchurch (St. Peter and St. Paul)

DYMCHURCH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and liberty of Romney-Marsh, locally in the hundred of Worth, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (S. W.) from Hythe; containing 613 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the level of Romney-Marsh, adjoining the sea, and comprises 1534 acres, of which 447 are marsh land; the soil, though shallow, is in general tolerably fertile, and the parish is celebrated for a superior breed of sheep, affording excellent wool. The lands are defended from the incroachments of the sea by a massive artificial wall, about three miles in length, more than twenty feet in height, and of sufficient breadth on the summit to allow the high road to pass along it for a considerable distance; it has three grand sluices for the general draining of Romney-Marsh, and is kept in repair at an average expense of about £4500 per annum, raised by scot payments levied on the whole district. The bailiff and jurats of the marsh hold a court of sessions here monthly in the New Hall, a plain neat building. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Thursday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 8½., and in the gift of the Crown, with a net income of £125: the glebe comprises about 10 acres, and a glebe-house. The church is a neat edifice, and has a very beautiful Norman arch in the chancel, and two Norman doors; it was repaired and enlarged in 1821. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; and a school partly supported by a bequest of land.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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