Durrington

DURRINGTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Amesbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 2 miles (N.) from Amesbury; containing 465 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Avon, appears to have belonged in part, for centuries, to the family of Poore, descendants in a direct line from the founder of Salisbury Cathedral: it comprises 2657a. 1r. 9p., whereof 1297 acres are arable, 1197 down, 31 dry pasture, and 54 water-meadow. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Winchester, whose tithes here have been commuted for £560, and whose glebe contains 236½ acres. The church is an ancient edifice with a pulpit of richly carved oak, and several of the pews are also embellished with carving, particularly the family pew of the Poores, which has a ceiling of oak, with an escutcheon of armorial bearings. At a short distance are the remains of a British town, called Durrington Walls, or Long Walls.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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