Dunnington (St. Nicholas)

DUNNINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, union, and E. riding of the county, of York, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from York; containing, with the township of Grimston, 765 inhabitants. The parish is on the road between York and Hull, and comprises by measurement 3199 acres, of which 2170 are in the township of Dunnington, and are chiefly arable land, with some pasture, and a little wood. The surface is tolerably elevated towards the north, and sloping southward for some distance, terminates in a plain: the soil varies considerably, on the high grounds being gravelly, on the lower sandy and moorish, and on the intermediate land a good loam. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19, and in the patronage of the Trustees of the Earl of Bridgewater: the tithes have been commuted for £348. 2., and there is a glebe of 106 acres. The church was enlarged in 1840, at the cost of nearly £1200, chiefly contributed by the Countess of Bridgewater; and the Rev. T. Egerton, the rector, and partly raised from rents issuing out of certain church lands. It consists of a nave, aisles, and chancel, the nave separated from the aisles by arches of circular form resting on round columns; the roof is of dark oak, and the interior has a chaste and beautiful appearance. The original styles of architecture, the Norman and the decorated English, have been adhered to in subsequent improvements. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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