Dunham-Massey

DUNHAM-MASSEY, a township, in the parish of Bowdon, union of Altrincham, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Altrincham; containing 1257 inhabitants. The village of Donehame is mentioned in Domesday book; it was the seat of the barony of that name, held by the barons Massey under the earls of Chester. Hamo, the last baron, died without male issue about the year 1341, and the property was afterwards possessed successively by the Inghams, Stranges, Fittons, Venables family, and Booths, from which last it devolved to the earls of Stamford and Warrington. The barons had a castle, which was defended by its owner, Hamo de Massey, in a rebellion against Henry II., in 1173; but not a relic of it now remains, nor can its site be ascertained. The township comprises 3334 acres of land. The seat of the Earl of Stamford and Warrington, here, is a quadrangular brick structure, built in 1730, and of spacious dimensions: there are two parks, one of which contains a great number of fine deer; and both, with the adjacent demesne, abound in noble timber, some of which has attained an extraordinary size, imparting an air of venerable grandeur to the mansion. The Duke of Bridgewater's canal passes near; and in one of the parks are vestiges of an old military road, and several tumuli, near which urns have been found. Tithe rent-charges have been awarded, of which £64 are payable to the vicar, and £402. 10. to the Bishop of Chester. There is an endowed school for boys at Seamons Moss; and another at Littleheath, founded and endowed by the late Mr. Thomas Walton.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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