Dodworth

DODWORTH, a township, in the parish of Silkstone, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Barnsley; containing 1474 inhabitants. In the earlier part of the reign of Henry VIII., two brothers of this place, Richard and William, sons of Ulf de Doddewr-da, gave to the convent of Pontefract, "for the love of God, and the salvation of their own souls, all the men they had on the land, with their houses and chattels for ever." The township is on the road between Doncaster and Saltersbrook, and comprises 1909 acres, of which about 1100 are arable, 560 pasture, 216 wood, and 33 road; the soil is fertile, the substratum chiefly coal, and the surrounding scenery pleasingly varied. The weaving of linen by hand-looms affords employment to about 500 persons. A church of a modernised Norman style of architecture, with a fine tower at the west end 70 feet in height, was erected in the village in 1844, at a cost of £1400, raised by subscription, aided by grants from the Incorporated and Pastoral Aid Societies, and towards which Mr. Thornely contributed £250: the living is in the Vicar's gift. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school is endowed with £11 per annum, and a house and garden for the master.

Transcribed from A Topographical Dictionary of England, by Samuel Lewis, 7th edition, published in 1848.

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